Case Study Questions

Below is the template COIL Institute Fellow's were asked to complete to provide information on their pilot COIL courses.

Some of the questions are links to all of the answers collected for that specific question. When the answers are particularly long, the question links to a page where you can see a .pdf with all the answers. Some of the questions are not linked either because that information was not provided by anyone or because we held it not to be relevant. We have, however, left those questions there to leave the template of questions complete.

 


COIL Institute for Globally Networked 

Learning in the Humanities 

Course Development and Implementation Case Study

 

Section 1: General Course Information

1. Please indicate the name of the co-taught course your team developed and offered in conjunction with the COIL Institute. If your course collaboration blended new or pre-existing courses, and each maintained a separate name, please indicate the name of each course.

2. Please indicate all faculty and other team members who were directly involved with creating, teaching, and supporting this course. If there were changes in faculty or staff along the way, please indicate this. Please ensure that individual roles are made clear. You can copy and paste to create additional areas to input team member info.

3. Please indicate the Institute track that this course was part of.

4. Please indicate the semester/term(s) in which your course(s) was offered. 

5. Please indicate the number of students enrolled from each institution.

6. Is this typical for classes of this type at institution #1? Or was the class size exceptionally small or large? If so, was this exception due to the globally networked nature of the course?

7. Is this typical for classes of this type at institution #2? Or was the class size exceptionally small or large? If so, was this exception due to the globally networked nature of the course?

Section 2: Issues of Language

8. What is the language(s) of instruction at each institution?

9. What is the primary language of most students in each class?

10. Did your course collaboration take place entirely in English? If not, what other language(s) were used?

11. How fluent in English, or any other languages used in class, were the student participants (use informal criteria)?

12. From comments made by each student cohort, and from each Fellow’s own observations, how significant was the potential difference in English language skills to the collaborative work undertaken between students in the class?

Section 3: Curricular Information

13. Was each course offered fully online, or in a blended format with both online and face-to-face meetings in the classroom?

14. For how many weeks did your classes collaborate?

15. Did either or both classes undertake significant class work or discussion related to their collaboration before and/or after the actual collaboration period? Describe that work.

Section 4: Asynchronous Technologies Used

17. Were these provided by one of the participating institutions or were they cloud-based?

18. Did you encounter significant technical problems using these tools? If so, please describe.

19. How often during the collaboration did the classes engage each other on a classroom level using these asynchronous tools? How often were students expected to login and use these asynchronous tools outside of class?

20. How, if at all, did you use any of these tools to provide venues for students to engage on an informal level?

21. Would you use the same tools again? If not, why?

Section 5: Synchronous Technologies Used 

22. What synchronous (real-time) tools (e.g. video, audio or chat) did you use to link your classrooms and/or your students? If you used multiple tools, what was the approximate percentage students spent using each of these tools?

23. Were these provided by one of the participating institutions or were they cloud-based? 

24. Did you encounter significant technical problems using these tools? If so, please describe.

25. How often during the collaboration did the classes engage each other on a classroom to classroom level using these synchronous tools? How often were students expected to contact each other synchronously outside of class? Did they?

26. How, if at all, did you use any of these tools to provide venues for students to engage on an informal level?

27. Would you use the same tools again? If not, why?

Section 6: Assessment Information

28. How did you assess your course? Please discuss both your assessment of the development of intercultural awareness and your evaluation of the disciplinary learning which took place.

29. Did you collaborate on creating a common assessment rubric for any aspects of your course? If so please explain how and include the rubric below.

30. What were the outcomes of those assessment activities?

31. Did you utilize any student peer assessments in your course? If yes, please describe. If no, in hindsight how do you think these might have been useful?

32. Did you develop a charter or guidelines for student interaction? If so, please paste it into the field below. How well did this document work as a means to guide student interactions? How might you change it in the future?

33. What was the approximate percentage of attrition or drop-outs from each student group during the course?

34. Is this typical for similar classes at your institutions? Do you think that any substantial differences, either positive or negative, could have been related to the globally networked nature of the course?

35. Please post anonymous comments from your students’ course evaluations if these are available. Group them by institution and include both positive and negative evaluations.  

Section 7: Institutional Support

36. Please identify and discuss the institutional support that each campus received throughout the entire Institute process in each of the categories below. Please discuss what you saw as the benefits of receiving such support, or the hindrance of not, to your team’s course development process. Start with when your team was writing the grant application, through to the Institute workshops, the course development phase, during course implementation, course assessment, and travel to the Capstone.

  • Financial
  • Administrative
  • Pedagogical
  • Technical

37. How much engagement has there been with the international programs office (if such an office exists) on your campuses?

38. Does the international programs office consider this initiative as relevant to the work that they are doing? If they do, is globally networked learning becoming an identified vector of internationalization at each institution? If not, how can the office become better engaged to consider globally networked learning?

39. When you applied to the COIL Institute did your partnered institutions or your departments/programs make a substantial commitment to continue developing a globally networked initiative? Or was it primarily a singular commitment on the part of the participating faculty Fellows? Please discuss.

40. Has this course been offered again, or is it scheduled to be offered in the near future, at any of the partnered institutions? If so, when will it be taught? If no, why not?

41. Do you expect that your work will result in other globally networked courses being offered in the near future at any of the partnered institutions? If so, please discuss any such plans.

42. Please describe the response of chairs, deans, provosts or other administrators to the possibility of expanding this pilot course(s) into a broader program of globally networked courses at each institution.

43. Overall, how would you assess each of your institutions commitment to further developing the work you have begun?

44. What would most help nurture the development of globally networked learning at your institutions?

Section 8: Reflections

45. What were the goals you set for yourselves when your team began the course (3-5 bullet points)?

46. In a general sense, how well do you feel these goals were achieved?

47. Looking back, what do you feel was most unique about this experience for your students?

48. From a pedagogical perspective, what areas of your collaborative course do you feel worked best?

49. Which were the most problematic?

50. How might you each teach the course differently in the future?

51. To better reflect on how your team’s course development process looked eighteen months ago, please take a few minutes to review the Information Gathering Tables you completed when you joined the Institute. Then please discuss two items from the table that appeared simple to resolve at the time, but which ended up being much more complex to develop than expected.

52. If your team included an instructional designer, please discuss their reflections on supporting a globally networked course. How different was their role compared to other courses they have facilitated in the past?

53. If your team included an international programs person, please discuss their reflections on supporting a globally networked course. How different was their role compared to other international partnerships or courses they have facilitated in the past?

54. Please discuss the amount of time all those involved spent developing and implementing this course? Include a comparison to the time it would likely take to develop, implement, and support a similar course which is not globally networked.

55. Was it worth it? Do you feel it would be significantly easier to implement and support another iteration of the same course again? How about developing a new course with a different partner faculty member and/or institution?

Section 9: Student Feedback

Section 10: Course Collaboration Narrative

Using the information from this document, as well as your course observation log in the Institute Commons, please prepare a 1500-2500 word narrative overview of your course collaboration from beginning to end. Feel free to lay this out in any way you choose, but below are some areas you may wish to explore:

Discuss each significant course activity and reflect on how each unfolded in practice.

What icebreakers and intercultural interactions were planned and implemented?

What worked and what did not?

What prompts or activities took the class in unexpected but interesting directions?

How well did the technologies selected support the pedagogical goals of the course?

What seemed to cause problems either for the students or for the faculty?

Did working through these problems lead to recognizable learning experiences or to defensiveness by some students or teachers?

N.B. Please see the individual case studies for the narratives.